Take This Job…or Change it!

The corporate world is changing along with our changing economy–and the pace of that change is accelerating. The expectations of both employees and employers do not resemble what we saw and heard a decade ago. We have been noticing a number of common threads emerging in our work with coaching clients, as some struggle with the major decision of whether to stay in their corporate job or choose another option. Others are not fortunate enough to have these choices. We are seeing an interesting shift on the part of employers. Corporations are encouraging career resiliency on the part of their own employees–and providing coaching resources to increase employees’ skills in self-determination and self management. This trend is growing–and we have some specific examples below.

I. Decision Criteria

When an individual thinks about a possible career change…

Sometimes the issues are complex, the decision factors are cloudy, and the process is a bit frustrating. Ambiguity pervades the process, and we know that ambiguity drains a lot of energy. One of the most valuable tools in the coach’s tool kit is the ability to ask the right questions. What follows is just a sampling of the many questions to be answered as you make the big decision of whether to stay in your current job or take another path. How many of these questions can you begin to answer  for yourself?

 

A. What is the least amount of change that will bring me satisfaction?

 

  • Is there a more satisfying way to earn a living?
  • Would an internal lateral move solve the problem?
  • Would a promotion solve the problem?
  • Is it time to leave my job?
  • Is it time to leave my company?
  • Do I just need a new boss?
  • Is it time to find a new career or profession?
  • What is my risk tolerance?
  • Do I have an entrepreneurial bent?
  • Do I really want to work for myself?

Am I financially prepared to make the desired changes

Career coaches and their clients gain insights into these questions by using validated and powerful assessment tools. Individuals benefit from the same tools that corporations use in making their hiring and promotion decisions. This means we can measure how you respond to your work environment, why you are motivated to act in a certain way, your behavioral style/personality type, communications style, values, attitudes, etc. Of course when making career decisions we also look at your professional experience, education, background, talents, and your specific work environment.

 

B. Companies have values and so do you. Do they match?

  • What do I want from my job?
  • What do I *really* want?
  • How can I determine the values and culture of my company?
  • Will I gain more responsibility in this job? At this company? Do I want to?
  • What is the best and highest use of my time?
  • What is important to my family–and how important is my family to me?

Different people are motivated by different things, and often these key employee motivation factors are baffling to managers. A study from George Mason University shows a big gap between what really motivates individual employees and what managers think motivates them.

 

Know what you want, and know what your company wants from you. These are very valuable insights! You will also want to watch for the booby traps, perhaps “corporate fallacies”: beliefs that may be widely held but not necessarily true for you. One example could be “working long hours brings big rewards”.

 

C. Am I alert to changes in the workplace and in the world? 

  • Do I keep my eyes and ears open?
  • Do I read widely and appreciate the value of lifelong learning?
  • Am I making good job-appropriate use of technology tools?
  • Am I a trend-spotter?
  • Can I make reasonable personal financial forecasts and projections?

We can no longer expect lifetime jobs. There is decreasing loyalty–on the part of both the company and its employees. Our business environment has changed and we can expect additional downsizing, rightsizing, layoffs, outsourcing, telecommuting, contractors vs. employees, etc. We can  expect multiple careers, earlier retirement, family issues, ‘lateral’ moves. Predict what’s coming–be a “futurist”! For an article on thinking like a futurist,

 

D. Are you ready to go? 

  • Do I know how to negotiate a successful “exit”?
  • Do I understand the differences between business building vs. job hunting?
  • Do I have a realistic time frame?
  • Do I have a strategic plan?
  • Do I understand the principles of creating strong alliances?

Want coaching or consulting? contact us at talkbiz@aol.com or 919-620-1551

The corporate world is changing along with our changing economy–and the pace of that change is accelerating. The expectations of both employees and employers do not resemble what we saw and heard a decade ago. We have been noticing a number of common threads emerging in our work with coaching clients, as some struggle with the major decision of whether to stay in their corporate job or choose another option. Others are not fortunate enough to have these choices. We are seeing an interesting shift on the part of employers. Corporations are encouraging career resiliency on the part of their own employees–and providing coaching resources to increase employees’ skills in self-determination and self management. This trend is growing–and we have some specific examples below.

I. Decision Criteria

When an individual thinks about a possible career change…

Sometimes the issues are complex, the decision factors are cloudy, and the process is a bit frustrating. Ambiguity pervades the process, and we know that ambiguity drains a lot of energy. One of the most valuable tools in the coach’s tool kit is the ability to ask the right questions. What follows is just a sampling of the many questions to be answered as you make the big decision of whether to stay in your current job or take another path. How many of these questions can you begin to answer  for yourself?

 

A. What is the least amount of change that will bring me satisfaction?

 

  • Is there a more satisfying way to earn a living?
  • Would an internal lateral move solve the problem?
  • Would a promotion solve the problem?
  • Is it time to leave my job?
  • Is it time to leave my company?
  • Do I just need a new boss?
  • Is it time to find a new career or profession?
  • What is my risk tolerance?
  • Do I have an entrepreneurial bent?
  • Do I really want to work for myself?
  • Am I financially prepared to make the desired change?

~~Coach’s Comment~~

Career coaches and their clients gain insights into these questions by using validated and powerful assessment tools. Individuals benefit from the same tools that corporations use in making their hiring and promotion decisions. This means we can measure how you respond to your work environment, why you are motivated to act in a certain way, your behavioral style/personality type, communications style, values, attitudes, etc. Of course when making career decisions we also look at your professional experience, education, background, talents, and your specific work environment.

 

B. Companies have values and so do you. Do they match?

  • What do I want from my job?
  • What do I *really* want?
  • How can I determine the values and culture of my company?
  • Will I gain more responsibility in this job? At this company? Do I want to?
  • What is the best and highest use of my time?
  • What is important to my family–and how important is my family to me?

Different people are motivated by different things, and often these key employee motivation factors are baffling to managers. A study from George Mason University shows a big gap between what really motivates individual employees and what managers think motivates them.

Know what you want, and know what your company wants from you. These are very valuable insights! You will also want to watch for the booby traps, perhaps “corporate fallacies”: beliefs that may be widely held but not necessarily true for you. One example could be “working long hours brings big rewards”.

C. Am I alert to changes in the workplace and in the world? 

  • Do I keep my eyes and ears open?
  • Do I read widely and appreciate the value of lifelong learning?
  • Am I making good job-appropriate use of technology tools?
  • Am I a trend-spotter?
  • Can I make reasonable personal financial forecasts and projections?

We can no longer expect lifetime jobs. There is decreasing loyalty–on the part of both the company and its employees. Our business environment has changed and we can expect additional downsizing, rightsizing, layoffs, outsourcing, telecommuting, contractors vs. employees, etc. We can  expect multiple careers, earlier retirement, family issues, ‘lateral’ moves. Predict what’s coming–be a “futurist”! For an article on thinking like a futurist,

D. Are you ready to go? 

  • Do I know how to negotiate a successful “exit”?
  • Do I understand the differences between business building vs. job hunting?
  • Do I have a realistic time frame?
  • Do I have a strategic plan?
  • Do I understand the principles of creating strong alliances?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *